ENTJ autism


#1

Hi guys,

Does any of you happen to ‘be on the autism spectrum’ / have Asperger’s, or the like?
I’m suspecting an ENTJ friend of mine might be (slightly) autistic, but since he’s very extroverted it’s quite hard to get a handle on it.
I know it sounds like two incompatible groups, but still I’m wondering how an autistic ENTJ might turn out.

Thanks!


#2

I kinda see personality disorders as personality features.

And none shall have an excuse for any behavior one may claim because of a “disorder” That’s like me going on a shooting rampage and claiming a disorder or medication for me to do so discounting the fact that I was able to drive to that location from a car that was well-maintained with specific weapons that I spent a good amount of time trained to utilize would grant thyself an insanity plea.


#3

This can’t be said about all scenarios, but I would agree that more accountability is needed. In some cases, disorders can be very debilitating, but it can’t just be used as an immunity to consequences.


#4

I have wondered of late if it might be true that the “normal” standard for humans is based on the SJ and SP tempermants. From what I have read SJ’s make up 45% of our society.

I am not saying that there are not some personality disorders, but that some deviations from “normal” may simply be and NT or NF temperment.

networkedblogs.com/jNlxL

This blog is interesting on that line of thinking.

mserogerbn


#5

Roger: I agree, especially with ADHD diagnoses that strike me as being basically BS, or caused by excessive intake of dietary sugar.

However, I do think much of society (especially in the US) really does have psychological issues, e.g. bipolar/ borderline personality disorder/ depression etc. I don’t believe these are biochemical in the vast majority of cases - i.e. I believe they are software, rather than hardware issues, requiring recognition and resolution of internal psychological conflicts, rather than pills. I believe that insurance reimbursement is the reason why most psychiatrists deal with these using drugs rather than therapy (which is tougher to reimburse).


#6

Interesting topic. I was actually tested to see if I was on the autism spectrum as a child on the recommendation of my teacher. Results came back that I was not, but she told my parents a lot of the reasoning behind thinking I was had to do with my skipping ahead in reading, coming across very bluntly to others (I corrected my teacher’s spelling very bluntly in front of our entire class on a regular basis-- she was a terrible speller) and delving into my own little ‘rabbit holes’ of ideas on my own apart from what my class was doing. She thought I was in my own world of ideas, I suppose, and I suppose she was right to some degree. However, I was always very outgoing and social with everyone in my class. Being an E, I always have thrived on conversation and being around others.

Anywho, I also think there is something to be said of a lot of these “diagnoses” being manners of supressing unique and valuable traits needed in this world. I’ve read before that primary school is really catered ideally toward ISFJ, and that may be what prompts so many schools to diagnose so many kids with all kinds of labels.

One interesting thing to note is during my testing process as a child, I also had to see a child psychologist. She kept prodding me for a long time to give her some dramatic dreams I have, so I just finally made one up so I could go back to class. I told her I dreamed that I was a bird flying and a hunter was trying to shoot me. She also asked me if anyone in my family had recently died. I told her my uncle died when I was 3, which was about five years before. She concluded in her evaluation that I had a phobia of being hurt or attacked and that I was traumatized by the death of my uncle. :unamused:

Also related to this topic, I’m curious if anyone has read this book. Pretty interesting: amazon.com/dp/0743243455


#7

Some people have said this.
I think there is something obscure when you are in your Ni phase.

Psychologist: I think you have Aspergers’. [question follows]
Me: [I’m thinking she is nuts and I put forward double minded metaphorical comment] :ugeek:
Psychologist: Really?
Me: [takes a deeper look…]
Psychologist: Aah! You didn’t mean it literally.
Me: [tries to hold down up coming face palm]
Psychologist: You don’t have it.

Those real “Aspies” just don’t get it how to interact properly. Some of them can not decipher facial expressions without aid and so on. I can be somewhere else not attending in the situation and it is obvious that you are not going get it all in that case. That is bit different than being completely oblivious. I have to also admit that my attitude towards something trivial and everyday matters is quite dismissive but I don’t think that is neurological disorder.

Anyways it is important to get in touch with your inner SFP. :dance: